Architectural Review 2006

Text from publication:

Clifton is a beach suburb close to central Cape Town. The Clifton Bungalow area consisted of small lightweight clapboard cottages. The area has been subject to strict planning controls in an effort to retain some of this character. City planning restrictions control roof shape, heights, proportion, windows and materials.

The previous existing building was the maximum development envelope. From this modifications and deviations are carefully negotiated with City planners and neighbours. The site is embedded between two parking area's and bounded on one side by street with one direct neighbour. It is both highly visible and private, being one of the few sites to have a large garden. There are particular privacy and view patterns for each room. The heights and positioning of windows are set to frame views precisely and excludes the ever present public traffic to and from the beach.

Within these constraints it was sought to create a sculptural contemporary building sensitive to its context but free from style imitation. The funnel shaped site determined a stepped street edge. The pre determined envelope set out a double storey rear

and single storey sea/garden front. The Great South African Stoep is celebrated onto the glorious garden- a jewel in this context. Central to the planning was a North Courtyard. This and the kitchen are the heart of the home. The courtyard creates a diversity of views and outdoor living connections and experiences. It floods the home with light, warmth, views.

The forgiving hipped roof cloaks the rambling form. The hipped roof also sits softly within the context and allows for slices of views all round. Projecting eaves strengthen the edges. Dormer windows punch through these. The vertical cladding is refreshing and contemporary.

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